04 October 2013

Marine Corps Marathon 2013

Support an Army Veteran, an Army wife, and Patriot Guard Rider in her endeavor to complete the Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday, October 27th. She is designating all donations she receives to the Patriot Guard Riders "Help on the Homefront" program in memory of her husband, Jon Perkins.
Jon and I met in Katterbach, Germany in 1981 while both serving in the U.S. Army. After a wonderful friendship, we came to realize that we wanted to spend our life together in marriage. We took our vows on January 7, 1984 and were lovingly committed to each other for over 28 years. We enjoyed our life together and the family we raised. Our children are a testament to Jon's integrity, work ethic and compassionate spirit. We heard about the Patriot Guard Riders in Summer 2011 and immediately became part of an organization that supports our military, past and present. Our first mission was Devin Snyder; a mission that affected us so deeply. We continued to participate in missions throughout the rest of the year, and even into the winter and spring of 2012. Friday, April 6th, I registered for my first half marathon in Buffalo, NY to be run Memorial weekend 2012. On Easter Sunday morning, April 8th, Jon died of a massive heart attack. When the day finally came to bury Jon, so many Patriot Guard came and stood at his funeral. We can never fully express what having them there to honor his memory meant to us. Just thinking about it even now fills me with gratitude. Jon would have loved this mission! I did run the half marathon with my son-in-law and continued to run to help with the sometimes overwhelming grief. Last December, I decided to run the Marine Corp Marathon in honor of Jon. Because Jon and I love(d) the Patriot Guard, I want to give all proceeds that I collect to Help on the Homefront. I am thankful to God for His mercy and grace through this time of both pain and healing, and for His protection as I train. I hope that you will sponsor me in this endeavor, either by the mile (26.2) or however much you can. If you are able to come to Washington D.C. on October 27, 2013 to cheer me on, I would be honored to have you there. Blessings to each of you, Kelly A. Perkins
Click here to donate!

05 December 2012

Wednesday Hero

Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas
Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas, disaster preparedness officer for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast, dressed in authentic Choctaw clothing, plays a Choctaw flute during a luncheon. 
 
The Native American Heritage celebration was hosted by Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 Detachment Jacksonville.
 
 
Photo courtesy U.S. Navy taken by Matt Simons These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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28 November 2012

Wednesday Hero

Fisher House Foundation
 
Fisher House Foundation The Fisher House Foundation is a great charity that offers free housing for families of wounded service members to stay in while their loved one recuperates. The Fisher House Foundation was start in 1990 and has a least one house at every major military medical center. Since there is no cost to the families they rely on donations to continue operating. So, please, head over to their site and check them out. And if you're able to, please make a donation.
 
 
These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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21 November 2012

Wednesday Hero

This Post Was Suggested By Michael
Pfc. Charles George
Pfc. Charles George 20 years old Cherokee, North Carolina Company C, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division August 23, 1932 - November 30, 1952 U.S. Army The name Charles George may sound familiar to some. That's because last week it was reported that two boys in New York were at a local antique shop looking for G.I. Joe's when they came across a number of military medals, Medal Of Honor, a Purple Heart, a bronze star and good conduct award, bearing the name Charles George. From Pfc. George's Medal Of Honor citation: Pfc. George, a member of Company C, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on the night of November 30, 1952. He was a member of a raiding party committed to engage the enemy and capture a prisoner for interrogation. Forging up the rugged slope of the key terrain feature, the group was subjected to intense mortar and machine gun fire and suffered several casualties. Throughout the advance, he fought valiantly and, upon reaching the crest of the hill, leaped into the trenches and closed with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When friendly troops were ordered to move back upon completion of the assignment, he and 2 comrades remained to cover the withdrawal. While in the process of leaving the trenches a hostile soldier hurled a grenade into their midst. Pfc. George shouted a warning to 1 comrade, pushed the other soldier out of danger, and, with full knowledge of the consequences, unhesitatingly threw himself upon the grenade, absorbing the full blast of the explosion. Although seriously wounded in this display of valor, he refrained from any outcry which would divulge the position of his companions. The 2 soldiers evacuated him to the forward aid station and shortly thereafter he succumbed to his wound. Pfc. George's indomitable courage, consummate devotion to duty, and willing self-sacrifice reflect the highest credit upon himself and uphold the finest traditions of the military service
You can read more here and here These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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14 November 2012

Wednesday Hero

This Post Was Suggested By Greta
Cpl. George Smith
Cpl. George Smith 90 years old from Sundance, New Mexico June 15, 1922 - October 31, 2012 U.S. Marines There aren't many Code Talkers left so it's a true tragedy when we lose one. George Smith joined the United States Marines when he was 17, after lying about his age, becoming one of three brothers in his family to do so. He was trained as a rifleman then as a Code Talker serving in a Pacific. He was honorably discharged in 1946.
 
 
You can read more on George Smith here These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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07 November 2012

Wednesday Hero

This Post Was Suggested By Michael
SSgt. Hiroshi H. Miyamura
SSgt. Hiroshi H. Miyamura 87 years old from Gallup, New Mexico Company H, 7th Infantry Regiment, 442nd Infantry Regiment U.S. Army From then Cpl. Miyamura's Medal Of Honor citation: Cpl. Miyamura, a member of Company H, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. On the night of 24 April, Company H was occupying a defensive position when the enemy fanatically attacked threatening to overrun the position. Cpl. Miyamura, a machinegun squad leader, aware of the imminent danger to his men unhesitatingly jumped from his shelter wielding his bayonet in close hand-to-hand combat killing approximately 10 of the enemy. Returning to his position, he administered first aid to the wounded and directed their evacuation. As another savage assault hit the line, he manned his machinegun and delivered withering fire until his ammunition was expended. He ordered the squad to withdraw while he stayed behind to render the gun inoperative. He then bayoneted his way through infiltrated enemy soldiers to a second gun emplacement and assisted in its operation. When the intensity of the attack necessitated the withdrawal of the company Cpl. Miyamura ordered his men to fall back while he remained to cover their movement. He killed more than 50 of the enemy before his ammunition was depleted and he was severely wounded. He maintained his magnificent stand despite his painful wounds, continuing to repel the attack until his position was overrun. When last seen he was fighting ferociously against an overwhelming number of enemy soldiers. Cpl. Miyamura's indomitable heroism and consummate devotion to duty reflect the utmost glory on himself and uphold the illustrious traditions on the military service. After his actions that day, Cpl. Miyamura was taken prisoner by the Chinese.
You can read more on SSgt. Miyamura here and here These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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31 October 2012

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Kathi
George Lutz
George Lutz George Lutz had the most horrible event a human can have happen in their lives happen to him. The loss of a child. His son, George Anthony Lutz II, was KIA in Fallujah, Iraq on December 29, 2005. Mr. Lutz almost let his son's loss beat him until he met a Mother, a few months later, who had lost her son as well. It was then that he realized that he could do something to help honor and remember the fallen. He set out on a mission to find a nationally recognized symbol for all fallen service members.
 


You can read more about George Lutz here These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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24 October 2012

Wednesday Hero

This Post Was Suggested By Michael
Sgt. Darrell Cole
Sgt. Darrell Cole 24 years old from Park Hills, Missouri 1st Battalion, 23rd Marines July 20, 1920 - February 19, 1945 U.S. Marines Sgt. Darrell Cole joined the U.S. Marines in 1941 and appointed to the Field Music School because he knew how to play the French Horn. He wasn't happy with the assignment and applied to be a machine-gunner four times before he was finally approved.
 
 In his three years of service, Sgt. Cold saw action in Guadalcanal, Kwajalein, Saipan and Iwo Jima. Sgt. Cole was KIA on February 19, 1945 in Iwo Jima when he was killed by an enemy grenade after he had single handily attacked two gun emplacements armed with only a pistol and one hand grenade. 
 
 For his actions that day Sgt. Darrell Cole was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor: "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Leader of a Machine-gun Section of Company B, First Battalion, Twenty-Third Marines, Fourth Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the assault on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945. Assailed by a tremendous volume of small-arms, mortar and artillery fire as he advanced with one squad of his section in the initial assault wave, Sergeant Cole boldly led his men up the sloping beach toward Airfield Number One despite the blanketing curtain of flying shrapnel and, personally destroying with hand grenades two hostile emplacements which menaced the progress of his unit, continued to move forward until a merciless barrage of fire emanating from three Japanese pillboxes halted the advance. Instantly placing his one remaining machine gun in action, he delivered a shattering fusillade and succeeded in silencing the nearest and most threatening emplacement before his weapon jammed and the enemy, reopening fire with knee mortars and grenades, pinned down his unit for the second time. Shrewdly gauging the tactical situation and evolving a daring plan of counterattack, Sergeant Cole, armed solely with a pistol and one grenade, coolly advanced alone to the hostile pillboxes. Hurling his one grenade at the enemy in sudden, swift attack, he quickly withdrew, returned to his own lines for additional grenades and again advanced, attacked, and withdrew. With enemy guns still active, he ran the gauntlet of slashing fire a third time to complete the total destruction of the Japanese strong point and the annihilation of the defending garrison in this final assault. Although instantly killed by an enemy grenade as he returned to his squad, Sergeant Cole had eliminated a formidable Japanese position, thereby enabling his company to storm the remaining fortifications, continue the advance and seize the objective. By his dauntless initiative, unfaltering courage and indomitable determination during a critical period of action, Sergeant Cole served as an inspiration to his comrades, and his stouthearted leadership in the face of almost certain death sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country."
 
 In March 11, 1996 he received the honor of having a Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, USS Cole (DDG-67), named after him.
 
 
You can read more about Sgt. Darrell Cole here and here These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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17 October 2012

Wednesday Hero

This Post Was Suggested By Kathi

 
Dan Carbonneau
Dan Carbonneau A grenade explosion might have put an end to Dan Carbonneau's effort to serve his country, but he hasn't let it sway his determination to serve others. He found a new mission: training assistance dogs. The former Marine from Excelsior spends 20 hours a week at Can Do Canines in New Hope, teaching dogs to do everything from punch elevator call buttons to open kitchen drawers. "The dogs help people with disabilities," he said. "It's nice to know that you're doing something positive for the community."
 
You Can Read More About Carbonneau Here These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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10 October 2012

Wednesday Hero

Master Sgt. Nicole Culverhouse
Master Sgt. Nicole Culverhouse U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Nicole Culverhouse, 60th Medical Support Squadron element chief, was recently reunited with her family almost four decades after she was kidnapped as a child in Bogota, Colombia.
 
You can read more about Master Sgt. Culverhouse here Photo Taken By Airman 1st Class Madelyn Ottem Courtesy U.S. Air Force These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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